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CEO Of Chinese Mobile Gaming Company, Moca, Talks To mobiSights

 

Established in 2007, Moca is a mobile Internet game developer.  Japan’s Infinity Venture Partners invested in the company in 2009.   The Following is an interview of Moca’s CEO, Song Xiaofei, by mobiSights.

Are WAP and JAVA primary profiting platforms for Moca? How big is the profit margin of the two platforms? What is the rate of retained customer?

At present, China’s mobile Internet is dominated by feature phones; our primary profiting platform is Skymobi’s MTK. WAP roughly covers over 12 million subscribers, generating 4 million monthly revenues. JAVA and MTK platforms will gather momentum in Q4 to surpass millions of revenue as its daily customer rate most likely will surpass 30%, with 15% monthly.

What are Moca’s strategies for Nokia OS (Symbian and S40) and Android? How big is the spending? And what is Moca’s view on  other operating systems?

Generally, we are compatible with all kinds of operating systems and JAVA plays a major part. With JAVA as a developing language, for us, taking up Android means product upgrading. Our basic source of revenue is JAVA, which will be replace by Android next year. We will watch closely the changes of all operating systems available to the market.  If one begins to dominate over another, it is important to be compatible with it and migrate accordingly.

What are your thoughts on the status and development of mobile-gaming?

It’s on the wane. Traditional MMO game is hard to sell. We support social gaming because it’s the future trend and a big player.

What do you make of single-player mobile phone gaming?

It is long past its prime.  The market has lost ground to social gaming based on Android and IOS platforms.  As many international companies have turned to social gaming, single-player gaming, in my opinion, does not boast a good profit model.

How are MMRPG companies doing based on PC? How far will it go?

It still has a strong role; however, the pressure from social gaming is easily seen when looking at companies like Shanda and Netease.  Mobilized and socialized PC is the way to go. Nevertheless, for the time being, games on PC is our main profit model until the exponential growth of smart phones and 3G networking pushes them past the PC.

What’s your view of the different kinds of profit model?

Basically, mobile gaming is composed by single-player, MMORPG and social gaming. Single-player serves the base.  MMORPG, because of their design, cannot become a main stream product.  Social gaming itself will continue to explode as costs reduce and user base expands.

Would you share with us your experience and suggestions for small teams and individual game developers? Like the priority of development, design of games, rate of retained customers and profit model?

From my perspective, small team and individual game developers are having a hard time with the rising threshold that must be met to find a platform partner. It takes millions of dollars worth of spending to create a product that stands the test of the market.  It would be wise for them to pair with big player like EA\GAMELOFT as their workshop.

In your estimation, where will the mobile Internet be in 3 to 5 years of time?

The future of mobile Internet is beyond imagination. With the rapid development of 3G networks and smart phones, those who miss out on the trend will face difficulties in 3 to 5 years.  In particular, big companies that are slow in their move to mobile Internet will likely be overtaken by competitors.  Stable networking by operators and improved mobile payment systems will lay the foundation of ground-breaking products and business models. I’m in favor of e-commerce and social gaming.  As for other areas, profit is no where in sight.

What do you value most in your daily operation?

Cost reduction, personnel recruitment, and product-oriented meetings—these are our priorities.

Big thanks to Song Xiaofei for taking time to speak with us.  Check back with mobiSights for more member interviews in the future!

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